Working at Winston’s Wish

Winston’s Wish currently employs 39 people at our head office in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, 8 people in Horsham, West Sussex, and 5 in the North West, some of which work full-time and some part-time.

Learn more about Winston’s Wish and find a suitable role:

Current vacancies

  • Family Services Trustee (voluntary)

    Trustee

    If you’d like to help us with the valuable work we do with bereaved children, this could be a great opportunity as Winston’s Wish is looking to recruit a new Trustee to its Board.

    We are looking to enhance our Board of Trustees by appointing a new trustee to support us as we grow and expand our services.  We want to reach more children, and are currently reviewing our service delivery model, with a focus on developing and extending services to increase our national reach, and to have a positive impact on the lives and life chances of bereaved children across the UK.

    We are seeking a trustee with experience of developing and delivering therapeutic interventions for children and families across a range of contexts, and using a range of service delivery models.  We would be especially keen to hear from people with experience of leading substantial innovations in service delivery.

    We anticipate that our new trustee will have expertise in one or more of the following areas:

    • Working therapeutically with children and young people, and their families and carers, either in the specific areas of bereavement or more broadly within mental health
    • Designing and implementing innovative models of therapeutic service delivery, based upon evidence based practice
    • Undertaking research with children and young people, and services which support them

    We would like our new trustee to contribute to the challenge of extending our models of service delivery, and to contribute to the work of the Family Services and Safeguarding Sub Committee.

    Trustees are required to attend four Board meetings a year (usually at our Cheltenham offices) and an annual strategy day.  There will be further requirements on a more ad hoc basis.  You’ll need to be able to demonstrate that you can commit the time needed to the role.

    The positions are unremunerated but reasonable expenses are paid.

    Apply online at jshechter@winstonswish.org.uk or by post to the Executive Office Manager, Winston’s Wish, 17 Royal Crescent, Cheltenham, GL50 3DA

    For an informal discussion please enquire in the first instance to Jill Shechter on 01242 515157.

  • Chair of the Board of Trustees (voluntary)

    Winston’s Wish is the UK’s leading charity supporting bereaved children and their families through the devastating impact of loss.  We have a national reputation for excellence and innovation.

    We are looking to enhance our Board of Trustees by appointing a new Chair to lead us as we grow and expand our services.  We want to reach more children, and we need to drive our income upwards in order to achieve that goal.

    We hope to find an individual with experience of leadership in the public, private or not for profit sector, who can drive strategic thinking, is skilled at people management and is knowledgeable about finance.  You will be joining a great Board leading an organisation of dedicated and skilled people who are passionate about their work.

    It’s a demanding role but the rewards are great. Applicants would ideally live within commuting distance of our offices in Cheltenham and potentially be able to commit up to four days a month.  If you’d like to help us with the valuable work we do, this could be a great opportunity.

    As we are a charity the position is unremunerated but reasonable expenses are paid.

    If you would like to help us with the valuable work we do, we would love to hear from you.  Please send a CV and covering letter to Jill Shechter jshechter@winstonswish.org.uk

    A Job Description and Person Specification is available to download here.

More information

Here at Winston’s Wish we invest in flexible working practices: some of our staff work full time and some work part-time. Our work is also supplemented by over 150 volunteers who undertake a range of vital roles. Find out more here.

For volunteering opportunities

See volunteering opportunities

Who we are

  • Trustees
    • W

      Barbara Want – Chair

      Barbara Want is a writer and broadcaster. She was a BBC TV producer before her twin sons were born in 2002. They live in London. She is also the author of Baby Secrets.

      Barbara was married to the Radio 4 broadcaster Nick Clarke who died of cancer in 2006. Since his death she has been commenting on a range of social and family matters such as bereavement and mental health. She has published a book about Nick’s illness, his death and her – and her sons’ – grief. It’s called ‘Why Not Me? A Story of Love and Loss’.

      Barbara and her twin sons came to Winston’s Wish for support and Barbara is now pleased to be offering her support and expertise back to the charity following her appointment as Trustee.

      Barbara feels passionately about helping schools to understand the importance of their role in supporting bereaved children.

    • clare-gallie-trustee

      Clare Gallie

      Clare joins Winston’s Wish with 13 years of experience in charity fundraising, including over 10 years as Head of UK Fundraising for CLIC Sargent. She currently holds the role of Director …

    • mark-smith-trustee

      Mark Smith

      Mark is the Chief Executive of Naomi House & Jacksplace, hospices for children and young adults in Winchester, and joins Winston’s Wish with over 15 years of experience in the charity …

    • Caroline Kean

      Caroline Kean

      Caroline is a solicitor and one of the founding partners of Wiggin LLP, a law firm that specialises in advising media and communications companies.
      Caroline lives in Cheltenham and has been a supporter of Winston’s Wish for many years. She brings over 30 years experience in governance and risk analysis to the board of trustees, together with her practical knowledge of all that is involved in building a business.

    • Trustee image

      Nigel Purveur

      Nigel is Managing Director for the Insurance Services Division of Capita – one of the largest Global Outsource Providers. His clients include Zurich, Abbey Life, Aviva, Friends Life, Prudential, Met Life and St James Place. Nigel’s role involves the management of teams both on and off shore. He is an approved person for the FCA and for regulators in Ireland and the Isle of Man, working within the professional services sector to build credible and sustainable outsourcing solutions. He has a track record of consistent, high quality delivery.

      Additionally, Nigel is Vice President of the Institute of Customer Services and is tasked with acting as the sounding board for new initiatives and offering advice to advance the growth, reputation and profile of the Institute through his expertise and network.

      Nigel has a longstanding relationship with Winston’s Wish which started in 1993 when he was one of the first volunteers and attended many of the residential groups over a number of years. More recently he has supported Winston’s through his many business connections.

    • Winston's Wish - Ian Paling - 22.2.2016

Picture by Antony Thompson - Thousand Word Media, NO SALES, NO SYNDICATION. Contact for more information mob: 07775556610 web: www.thousandwordmedia.com email: antony@thousandwordmedia.com

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      Ian Paling

      Ian is a metallurgist by background and, for the last 30 years has worked in the Medical Device sector.

      He was CEO of Corin Group PLC, a leading manufacturer of hip and knee devices, until the end of 2007, having been with the company through private ownership and then leading a highly successful IPO on the main market of the LSE, in 2002. More recently, Ian has held positions as Chairman, Director and CEO of several public and private companies. Ian is a past CEO of the Year for the London Stock Exchange TechMark Mediscience Index companies, and Ernst and Young Entrepreneur of the Year for the South region.

      Ian has a close affinity to Winston’s Wish as his daughter, Alice, was helped tremendously by the organisation, following the death of her mother.

    • W

      Philippa Grace

      Philippa is a specialist senior educational psychologist for mental health in Bradford. She works with vulnerable children with a wide range of needs and is aware of how significant, and yet unacknowledged, bereavement can be as a risk factor in young children’s lives. Philippa recently completed her doctorate research into children’s experiences of parental bereavement through substance misuse.

      Currently living in West Yorkshire, Philippa has two children and enjoys mountain biking and gardening in her spare time. She considers it a priviledge and an honour to be a part of Winston’s Wish to try to ensure that children have the support and understanding they need to help them with a traumatic experience.

    • W

      Tracy Taylor

      Tracy is the Chief Executive Officer of a large NHS Trust which provides core and regional specialist community health services. Tracy began her career as a registered nurse and held a number of clinical roles in the community working with young children and their families.

      Following her move into more managerially focused roles she has held a variety of general management and Board Director positions covering a broad range of responsibilities including service improvement, performance and organisational development. Outside of work Tracy keeps herself busy as a married mother of three lively boys and has become an accustomed all weather supporter of their sporting activities.

  • Our President and Patrons
    • Lady March

      Lady March – President

      Bereavement strikes a very personal chord with Lady March – when she was four years old her father died suddenly of a heart attack. She says, “I think that once you have experienced the death of someone close to you, it’s as though you have crossed a river and you can’t go back. It doesn’t matter if it happens to you when you are four or forty. Suddenly you find yourself in new territory, and however well-meaning the people left on the other side, they don’t really know where you are”.

      As well as being a parent of four children herself, Lady March is also active in running the Goodwood Estate.

    • Julie Stokes

      Julie Stokes OBE – Founder Patron

      Julie Stokes, founder of Winston’s Wish was born in 1961 and educated at St. Michael’s Convent Grammar School in London. Julie received a 1st class honours degree in Psychology and in 1987 went on to receive a Masters in Clinical Psychology.

      Julie started her career with the NHS in 1984 and was instrumental in establishing one of the first hospital-based teams focusing on palliative care. Her desire to involve children before and after a parent’s death and to support parents led her to apply to the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust. In 1992 she was awarded a Fellowship and travelled to America and Canada to better understand the services provided in these countries for bereaved children. Inspired by what she had experienced, Julie founded Winston’s Wish in September of that year. After just 3 years the grief support programme was well established and Julie won the BT/Childline award ‘for providing outstanding services to children’

      Julie continues to lecture both nationally and internationally, is an established author and has contributed to 11 documentaries including the ground breaking Mummy Diaries series in 2007.

      In December 2006, Julie received an OBE for services to children and families. She is currently Vice Chair of The Childhood Bereavement Network. She now works as an Executive Coach.

    • Baroness Fritchie

      Baroness Fritchie

      Baroness Fritchie, DBE (known as Rennie Fritchie) was born in Fife, Scotland and has enjoyed an extensive career specialising in training and development. Currently a ‘portfolio’ worker, Lady Fritchie holds various positions including United Kingdom Commissioner for Public Appointments and President of the Pennell Initiative for Women’s Health in Later Life.

      In the 1970s, she was one of the first full-time women’s training advisers and pioneered the training of staff in what was then the new Equal Opportunities Commission. Using a German Marshall Fellowship awarded in 1985 she initiated programmes to improve the status of women which she has written about and spoken extensively on for television and radio.

      Baroness Fritchie holds an honorary Professorship in Creative Leadership at York University and is Pro-Chancellor at Southampton University. A Civil Service Commissioner and Vice-Chair of the Stroud and Swindon Building Society, she also sits as a crossbencher in the House of Lords.

    • Randolph Churchill

      Randolph Churchill

      Randolph was born in January 1965 shortly before the death of his great grandfather, Sir Winston Churchill. After attending Harrow, Randolph undertook a short service commission in the Royal Navy and served as Gunnery Officer of HMS Alderney in the coastal protection squadron. On completion of the Navigating Officer Course he was appointed Navigator of HMS Swallow in the Hong Kong Squadron and promoted to Lieutenant. Subsequently, Randolph attended Buckingham University where he was awarded a degree in Financial Management and Accountancy, before joining Deloitte and Touche where he qualified as a Chartered Accountant.

      In 1995 Randolph joined Lazard Asset Management, becoming Director of the Charities Division. In 2000 Randolph joined Schroder Private Bank and in 2003 he moved to Rathbones where he is an Investment Director.

      Randolph is a Trustee of the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust, Honorary Fellow of Churchill College Cambridge, Director of the Armed Services Charities Advisory Company (that oversees the investment for over 100 service charities) and Trustee of the Churchill Centre UK and US. He is also a Patron of JAGS and Winston’s Wish. Randolph is a regular speaker at Churchill conferences and dinners. Randolph and his wife Catherine have four children and live close to Sir Winston’s home at Chartwell in Kent.

    • Professor Lord Winston

      Professor Lord Winston

      “I was nine years old when my father died, and my brother was only four. Whilst making a ‘Child of Our Time’ I have also witnessed the impact of challenging deaths like suicide which often leave young children bewildered and confused with parents who need support to stabilise family life.

      I absolutely believe that it is not so much what happens to us in life but our attitude and response to such challenges that makes all the difference. Winston’s Wish has developed a fantastic range of services which help bereaved children build memories so that important relationships remain safe, and grow in confidence. When families feel most isolated Winston’s Wish turns vulnerability into hope and helps children to understand that there is life after a death in the family.

      I am delighted to be a Patron of this truly wonderful organisation and know that with your support Winston’s Wish will grow and develop in order to help even more bereaved children on their journey through grief”.

  • Senior management
    • Winston's Wish - Fergus Crow - 22.2.2016

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The photographic copyright (© 2016) is exclusively retained by the works creator at all times and sales, syndication or offering the work for future publication to a third party without the photographer's knowledge or agreement is in breach of the Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988, (Part 1, Section 4, 2b). Please contact the photographer should you have any questions with regard to the use of the attached work and any rights involved.

      Fergus Crow – Chief Executive Officer

      Fergus joined Winston’s Wish as Chief Executive in October 2015 after nearly a decade at the National Children’s Bureau. His responsibilities there included the Anti-Bullying Alliance, the Childhood Bereavement Network and the Council for Disabled Children. Fergus made key contributions to national policy and practice development in a number of areas, particularly in relation to the emotional and social development and well-being of children and young people in education.

      Prior to joining the National Children’s Bureau Fergus held a number of roles in education and children’s services. He started his career in teaching, and has a Master’s degree in education from the University of Cambridge.

      Fergus believes passionately that with the right support at the right time children who have been bereaved can learn to live with their grief, adjust to the changes that the death of someone close to them inevitably brings, and go on to lead full and flourishing lives. This belief stems not only from his professional career but also from his own experience of losing his father to cancer when Fergus was 19.

    • Emma Radley – Director of Fundraising

      Emma joined Winston’s Wish as Director of Fundraising in February 2016, following a fundraising career in higher education, at Oxford Brookes University, and health, at the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust where she was involved in the fundraising campaign for the Oxford Children’s Hospital.

      Personally, Emma has received a great deal of bereavement support, both for herself and her young family, following the death of her son in 2011. This has been incredibly beneficial and has helped Emma and her husband to support their daughter, who was just two when her younger brother died. This experience gives Emma a real understanding of the importance of the services that Winston’s Wish provides.

      Emma brings both professional experience and expertise together with her personal experience and passions, to lead the Fundraising team at Winston’s Wish into the future.

    • Sacha Richardson – Director of Family Services

      Sacha joined Winston’s Wish in March 2016 but his connection with the organisation started in 1995 when he was a volunteer on a Winston’s Wish residential weekend. This experience inspired him, helping him to launch and develop a group work programme for children at another family bereavement charity where he worked for twenty two years. He was also Chair of the Child Bereavement Network for seven years, and in that time worked closely in partnership and learnt from many innovative, dedicated and open-hearted people working within this field. He is currently chair of The Family Bereavement Network in Europe.

      Sacha is a UKCP registered Psychotherapist who has worked with bereaved children, parents and families since 1994. He feels honoured and privileged to lead the highly skilled and committed family services team at Winston’s Wish and build upon the charity’s tradition of excellence and innovation.

      He is delighted that this position also brings so many opportunities to work in partnership with others to help to improve the lives of children who have been bereaved.

    • Winston's Wish - 18.3.2015

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The photographic copyright (© 2015) is exclusively retained by the works creator at all times and sales, syndication or offering the work for future publication to a third party without the photographer's knowledge or agreement is in breach of the Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988, (Part 1, Section 4, 2b). Please contact the photographer should you have any questions with regard to the use of the attached work and any rights involved.

      Colin Ireland – Head of Finance

      Colin joined the Winston’s Wish finance team in 2013. He is a Chartered Accountant and completed his professional qualifications with Price Waterhouse Coopers at their London Office in 1988.

      Colin has a lot of previous commercial experience having been involved with numerous businesses from Financial services to Retail. He has also held several Financial Director positions in organisations involved in engineering, construction and IT.

      Although Colin initially joined Winston’s Wish on an interim basis, he was so enthused by the great work carried out by the charity that he was delighted to accept the permanent role as Head of Finance.

  • Celebrity supporters
    • Heston Blumenthal-smaller

      Heston Blumenthal

      Heston Blumenthal is a supporter of our Great British Brekkie campaign.

      More about Great British Brekkie.

    • Chris Ramsey - smaller

      Chris Ramsey

      Chris Ramsey is a supporter of our Great British Brekkie campaign.

      More about Great British Brekkie.

    • Judi Dench

      Dame Judi Dench

      Dame Judi Dench is a supporter of our Great British Brekkie campaign.

      More about Great British Brekkie.

    • Susan Lewis

      Susan Lewis

      It is my hope, during my time as an ambassador, to bring awareness to the vital role that Winston’s Wish plays in the lives of children who are unfortunate enough to suffer the loss of one, or even both parents, whether to illness, accident, or perhaps even murder or suicide. I see this charity as its own, very special version, of Save the Children, because that’s what it is all about, saving our children, and their families, from the devastating effects of bereavement.

      Should you feel that I could be useful in any way to your fundraising efforts, then please don’t hesitate to contact me through Winston’s Wish. I feel very strongly about my involvement with this charity, and am keen to assist those who do such marvellous work.

      More about Susan Lewis.

  • Young Ambassadors
    • Eleanor cropped

      Eleanor

      I was bereaved at the age of 10 when my Dad took his own life as a result of his struggle with depression. My Mum and I dealt with the immediate aftermath with little support until she was put in contact with Winston’s wish when I was 12.

      We both attended the residential weekend for families bereaved by suicide, and it was incredible to meet so many other people who had been through a similar experience to me, so who really understood what it was like to lose a parent in that way.

      I became a young ambassador because I wanted to give something back to this incredible charity and hope to stay involved with Winston’s Wish for many years to come.
      .

    • Launch of the Winston's Wish Young Ambassador initiative in The Churchill Room at The Houses of Parliament, London - 21.10.2013

Picture by Carl Hewlett/TWM - Thousand Word Media Ltd, NO SALES, NO SYNDICATION. Contact for more information mob: 07775556610 web: www.thousandwordmedia.com email: antony@thousandwordmedia.com

The photographic copyright (© 2013) is exclusively retained by the works creator at all times and sales, syndication or offering the work for future publication to a third party without the photographer's knowledge or agreement is in breach of the Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988, (Part 1, Section 4, 2b). Please contact the photographer should you have any questions with regard to the use of the attached work and any rights involved.

      Tim

      My mum died when I was 16 from PVL, a form of super-bug that is quite rare. I think in the year my mum died (2006) there were around 4 or 5 fatalities.

      I live in Yorkshire and I wasn’t really given any support from anywhere. I was pointed towards Winston’s Wish well over 6 months after my mum died by a bereavement counselor who was only brought in to try and resolve mine and my Dad’s relationship. This links in to my wish to be involved with the charity. I want to raise awareness for young people by showing them that there is support out there because I wasn’t given any, I was just left to it.

      Once I did discover Winston’s Wish I used some of the online features.
      .

    • Launch of the Winston's Wish Young Ambassador initiative in The Churchill Room at The Houses of Parliament, London - 21.10.2013

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The photographic copyright (© 2013) is exclusively retained by the works creator at all times and sales, syndication or offering the work for future publication to a third party without the photographer's knowledge or agreement is in breach of the Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988, (Part 1, Section 4, 2b). Please contact the photographer should you have any questions with regard to the use of the attached work and any rights involved.

      Rhiannon

      I was 9 years old when my father was killed in a car accident in which all my family were involved. Once we were out of hospital, my four siblings and I went to one of the Winston’s Wish residential weekends. Despite my young age, I remember that weekend so well. I still have my memory box with everything inside it!

      Because of the circumstances of my father’s death, with the rest of my family being treated for very serious injuries in hospital, our bereavement may have been offset a bit by everything else going on. Winston’s Wish gave us the opportunity to really focus on our loss and work through a lot of our thoughts and feelings in a unique and special environment – somewhere full of other children whose lives had been turned upside down.

      My family still lights our teddy bear candles from Winston’s Wish on the anniversary of my father’s death – a tradition that has been held now for over fifteen years. So I feel very strongly about the work of the charity and believe that it can be an enormous hep and invaluable experience for bereaved children. Becoming a Young Ambassador is a way to give something back.
      .

    • Poppy_Rees_120

      Poppy

      I first discovered my passion for charity when I took part in a work experience placement at another charity head office when I was 15. Since then I have always known my heart lies in helping others. The buzz you get from knowing that you can make a difference to someone’s life inspires me and encourages me to do more.

      I haven’t been through Winston’s Wish myself but I have some friends who have benefited from the service. They gained support at what is quite possibly the hardest stage in anyone’s life, making them the strong people they are today.

      I am thoroughly looking forward to representing Winston’s Wish as a Young Ambassador; lots of things to come, lots of money to raise and all with some amazing people. Here’s to the future!
      .

    • Nash cropped

      Nash

      Bereavement is one of the most difficult experiences in life. It’s a catalyst for a range of cynical emotions and overwhelms an individual with unbearable grief. This is why I am so grateful for charities like Winston’s Wish who offer care and support for children and young people dealing with the loss of a parent.

      When I was 9, my father died from a heart attack and I later lost my mother to cancer. I felt so alienated, angry and very lonely. The hardest thing to deal with was how no one could possibly understand the emotional trauma I was going through. I remember the unexplainable sadness, the bitterness, the longing. But the worst feeling was the grief and how it left me broken at times.

      Although I personally wasn’t supported by Winston’s Wish, if it wasn’t for bereavement support I wouldn’t be where I am today. When going through the bereavement process I wanted more than anything to feel like I wasn’t alone, which is why I’m very enthusiastic about being a Young Ambassador for Winston’s Wish. It provides me with the opportunity to help a charity that makes sense out of something that doesn’t make sense and to help individuals like me who need that support.

      The loss of a parent is a turning point in everyone’s lives. In a young person it’s the loss of childhood, innocence and security. To help a charity like Winston’s Wish is something that I am proud to be a part of.
      .

    • Launch of the Winston's Wish Young Ambassador initiative in The Churchill Room at The Houses of Parliament, London - 21.10.2013

Picture by Carl Hewlett/TWM - Thousand Word Media Ltd, NO SALES, NO SYNDICATION. Contact for more information mob: 07775556610 web: www.thousandwordmedia.com email: antony@thousandwordmedia.com

The photographic copyright (© 2013) is exclusively retained by the works creator at all times and sales, syndication or offering the work for future publication to a third party without the photographer's knowledge or agreement is in breach of the Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988, (Part 1, Section 4, 2b). Please contact the photographer should you have any questions with regard to the use of the attached work and any rights involved.

      Lawrence

      I decided to become a Young Ambassador for Winston’s Wish with the aim to provide some form of support and help to those who have endured the most painful thing one can, lose a loved one.

      Having lost my father at the age of 14 I have personally felt and dealt with the consequences of bereavement at a young age. The process of loss has made me who I am today. After using the services of Winston’s Wish I decided to return to them with the aim of helping young people going through what I went through and by becoming part of the support structure.

      The loss of a loved one will lead you to the darkest place you will ever go. Winston’s Wish and the work they do, or should I say we do, acts as a hand to hold helping to guide you back to the light of life.

      I hope that by being young I have the mindset that will better understand and appreciate the needs of a child or young adult. Winston’s Wish is a growing, expanding and evolving charity, and I want to have an influence on the direction it takes.
      .

    • Jennie_Briant_120

      Jennie

      I joined Winston’s Wish at the age of 12 following the unexpected loss of my father through suicide in 2003. Winston’s Wish is a charity that means so much to me and my family; I couldn’t thank them enough for the help they have given us.

      I learnt to laugh again, being ‘able’ to deal with life as a roller coaster and the chance to meet others in the same situation. I know now you are never alone and I cannot wait to continue to support them and others that sadly will continue to use their services.

      I feel privileged to become a Young Ambassador; it’s an opportunity to continue to express our thanks and get stuck in with lots of exciting events, meet new people, represent Winston’s Wish and build upon my confidence.
      .

    • Hatty_Davis_121

      Hatty

      I lost my Mum to cancer when I was just 8 years old, and it was the most painful experience I’ve had to deal with.

      My Dad got in contact with Winston’s Wish just before she passed, and they were brilliant from then on; they helped him explain her death to us, we went on a residential and day trips, participated in group activities and even made a programme on Chanel 5 with them!

      Now I’m and adult, I feel very strongly about giving something back to Winston’s Wish, for the years of support and kindness they have offered me! Young Ambassadors is a great way of doing this, and I’m excited to be part of the team!
      .

    • Launch of the Winston's Wish Young Ambassador initiative in The Churchill Room at The Houses of Parliament, London - 21.10.2013

Picture by Carl Hewlett/TWM - Thousand Word Media Ltd, NO SALES, NO SYNDICATION. Contact for more information mob: 07775556610 web: www.thousandwordmedia.com email: antony@thousandwordmedia.com

The photographic copyright (© 2013) is exclusively retained by the works creator at all times and sales, syndication or offering the work for future publication to a third party without the photographer's knowledge or agreement is in breach of the Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988, (Part 1, Section 4, 2b). Please contact the photographer should you have any questions with regard to the use of the attached work and any rights involved.

      Emma

      I lost my Dad when I was 15. Although I wasn’t supported by Winston’s Wish at the time, I wanted to become a Young Ambassador to help others who have lost parents through my experience and learning of how to cope with such a life changing event, to raise as much money as possible and to raise the profile of the charity.

      I believe from being a Young Ambassador I will meet new friends with similar life experiences, I will gain experience in public speaking and have the opportunity to work with a wide range of people.
      .

    • Emily_Vandyke_120

      Emily

      My Dad died through suicide when I was fifteen and it left me lost and confused. People at school didn’t understand and even those who had been through the loss of a parent didn’t come forward and offer me support.

      My Mum found Winston’s Wish and they helped us through every step of the way – from advising her how to tell my brother and I the news, to sending us on one of their residential weekends so we could meet other families in the same boat. Now she is a volunteer for Winston’s Wish and helps at these residential weekends as well as fundraising and raising awareness in our area.

      Being with other young people at the residential weekend made me realise I was not alone as they knew how I felt, they were having the same feelings too. When I came away afterwards I had a strong ambition to give something back to the charity and help other young children going through the bereavement process. Now that I am in my twenties this aspiration is coming true!

      I came to Winston’s Wish when I was 9 years old, after my Dad killed himself. No one seemed to know what to say to me, I remember missing school and feelings of overwhelming anger and grief. Winston’s Wish showed me that I was not alone. The residential weekend and counselling sessions gave me the ability to cope with my feelings and understand them.
      .

    • Delia

      I wanted to become a Winston’s Wish Young Ambassador so that I could give something back to a charity that has done so much for my family and I over the years.

      My Dad died in a tragic accident at home when my brother was 6 and I was only 4 years old. As I grew older I found it difficult to come to terms with the fact that he was never going to come back and that I had very few memories of him. Winston’s Wish really helped me to understand that I was not the only person who was experiencing grief and anger and that it was okay to talk about it.

      Winston’s Wish has given me so much valuable help over the years that I shall never forget what they have done for me. I shall always treasure the memory box my Mum and I put together after Winston’s Wish started to support us as a family.

      Spreading awareness of the great work that Winston’s Wish does is really important to me and during my time as a Young Ambassador I hope to be able to do this, wherever I am and whatever I am doing.
      .

    • Catrin

      Catrin

      I was five years old when my dad was killed in a car accident and my family, including myself, left injured. I was traumatised by this as I remember everything about it, so I transformed myself into a Dalmation dog, so that I would not have to think about what was happening around me.

      My siblings and I went to a Winston’s Wish residential weekend a year later. I remember having so much fun and the volunteers were amazing. I still have my memory box.

      I would love to be a part of something that brings that help and opportunity to others who has lost someone. My sister Rhiannon became a Young Ambassador at the beginning of this year and from hearing about what they do, it made me really want to become one and give back to Winston’s Wish in whatever way I can.
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    • Launch of the Winston's Wish Young Ambassador initiative in The Churchill Room at The Houses of Parliament, London - 21.10.2013

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      Amelia

      I got involved with Winston’s Wish when sadly my dad was killed in an accident when I was 12, and they have been brilliant in helping me and my family for the past few years!
      When I heard about the Young Ambassador group I instantly wanted to get involved because I wanted to give something back to the charity. I also wanted to make other people aware of what Winston’s Wish does and what an amazing charity it is.

      I have gained so much from the support that they have given me. I suffered severe anxiety after Dad’s accident and used to worry about everyone I loved thinking something bad was going to happen to them. Kate, one of the Senior Practitioners, gave me strategies to help manage these feelings.

      Winston’s Wish has helped me realise that anyone can lose a parent at any age and that I’m not the only person. By being a Young Ambassador not only do I want to give something back to the charity, but I want to be able to help the charity in gaining support for what they do.

      A bonus is being able to meet new people who are keen on helping Winston’s Wish as well!
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    • Zoe cropped

      Zoe

      My Dad was killed in a mid-air collision when I was 3 and my brother was 2. At the time I didn’t really understand and it wasn’t until I was 8 that my Mum realised I was blaming myself and that was when I received help from Winston’s Wish. My brother and I went on a camp and my Mum went on the adult camp. I became a new stronger person and can now talk freely about my Dad without getting really upset. I just can’t thank Winston’s Wish enough and nothing I can do can repay what they did for me and my family, but I have decided to become e a young ambassador to help in whatever way I can.
      In becoming a young ambassador I hope to share my story with other families in a similar situation just to simply let them know it does get better and to have someone to relate to I can’t wait to get more involved.
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    • Scott cropped

      Scott

      My Dad died suddenly from a cardiomyopathy (Heart attack) in 2004, when I was six. My sisters and I went to Winston’s Wish after his death and we made memory boxes, some of which I still have 11 years on.

      I think the most important thing for a bereaved child is to ensure their loved one is not forgotten.

      I contacted Winston’s Wish again when I was 17 and have become a young ambassador to raise awareness for the charity so other children can be supported like I was.
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    • Scarlett cropped

      Scarlett

      My Dad died suddenly from a cardiomyopathy (Heart attack) in 2004, when I was six. My sisters and I went to Winston’s Wish after his death and we made memory boxes, some of which I still have 11 years on.

      I think the most important thing for a bereaved child is to ensure their loved one is not forgotten.

      I contacted Winston’s Wish again when I was 17 and have become a young ambassador to raise awareness for the charity so other children can be supported like I was.
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    • Naomi cropped

      Naomi

      When I was just 6 weeks old I was in my Mum’s arms by the side of my Dad’s bed in hospital, his skin cancer had taken a nasty turn and there was nothing they could do. After that day my Mum was left to look after my 2 year old brother and baby me. Once Scott and I were old enough our family got in touch with Winston’s Wish, they immediately gave my Mum the relief she needed and the support that I needed but most importantly helped us all remember my Dad and help rebuild our lives.

      In 2012 my step Dad, Gary, also lost his battle with cancer. I was devastated but I knew Winston’s Wish was there once again to help me through it.

      Being a young ambassador means a lot to me, giving back to the charity that’s been there for me all my life is important. More people should know about their amazing work and hopefully by being a YA I can help fundraise and raise more awareness.
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    • Martyna cropped

      Martyna

      I lost my brother, when I was 11 years old. He committed suicide, I still don’t really understand why but it happened. All I can do is live on the memory of him. I am really happy to be a young ambassador for WW because I want to help others
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    • Holly cropped

      Holly

      Being bereaved of my Dad at the age of 13 through a car accident caused by an illegal immigrant left me sad and angry, who would think you could experience so many different emotions whilst grieving.

      Immediately my brother and I were put into contact with Winston’s Wish. They were fantastic. They helped me deal with all my mixed emotions and control the anger I felt. The anger wall on the residential weekend was definitely one of my favourites. Thanks to Winston’s Wish I am strong enough today to tell my story to help others.

      Ten years later and I have enrolled on a children and adolescents counselling course. I want to help and give back some of my time to Winston’s Wish. When I heard about the Young Ambassadors I was keen to get involved and help this fantastic charity, after all they do so much for children of all ages who have one way or another become bereaved.
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    • Grace cropped

      Grace

      I was 8 years old when my Dad died of Pancreatic cancer. Then 2 years later my Nan dies of the same disease. I was supported by Winston’s Wish which helped me through my bereavement as a worried, angry kid.
      I became a young ambassador to give back to such an amazing charity. Being a YA has helped me to talk to people and help others. I like to promote WW and being a YA can help me do that.
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    • Emily cropped

      Emily

      I came to Winton’s Wish when I was 9 years old, after my Dad killed himself. No one seemed to know what to say to me, I remember missing school and feelings of overwhelming anger and grief. Winston’s Wish showed me that I was not alone. The residential weekend and counselling sessions gave me the ability to cope with my feelings and understand them.
      I wouldn’t be the person I am today without the help I received. And now I want to give something back to the charity. It’s such an important support network for bereaved families and I want to do as much as I can to help others like myself!
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